Grooming and group cohesion in primates: implications for the evolution of language

@article{Grueter2013GroomingAG,
  title={Grooming and group cohesion in primates: implications for the evolution of language},
  author={Cyril C. Grueter and Cyril C. Grueter and Anne Bissonnette and Karin Isler and Carel P. van Schaik},
  journal={Evolution and Human Behavior},
  year={2013},
  volume={34},
  pages={61-68}
}
It is well established that allogrooming, which evolved for a hygienic function, has acquired an important derived social function in many primates. In particular, it has been postulated that grooming may play an essential role in group cohesion and that human language, as verbal grooming or gossip, evolved to maintain group cohesion in the hominin lineage with its unusually large group sizes. Here, we examine this group cohesion hypothesis and test it against the alternative grooming-need… Expand

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