Grooming, competition and social rank among female primates: a meta-analysis

@article{Schino2001GroomingCA,
  title={Grooming, competition and social rank among female primates: a meta-analysis},
  author={G. Schino},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2001},
  volume={62},
  pages={265-271}
}
  • G. Schino
  • Published 2001
  • Psychology
  • Animal Behaviour
Abstract Seyfarth (1977, Journal of Theoretical Biology,65, 671–698) proposed a model of social grooming among female monkeys that has had an enormous influence in the primatological literature. To test this model, I reviewed published data on primate grooming behaviour, using meta-analytical techniques. An analysis of grooming behaviour in 27 different social groups belonging to 14 different species revealed that a significant role in the distribution of grooming was played by attraction to… Expand
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