Grey Parrot (Psittacus erithacus) numerical abilities: addition and further experiments on a zero-like concept.

@article{Pepperberg2006GreyP,
  title={Grey Parrot (Psittacus erithacus) numerical abilities: addition and further experiments on a zero-like concept.},
  author={Irene M. Pepperberg},
  journal={Journal of comparative psychology},
  year={2006},
  volume={120 1},
  pages={
          1-11
        }
}
  • I. Pepperberg
  • Published 1 February 2006
  • Biology
  • Journal of comparative psychology
A Grey parrot (Psittacus erithacus), able to quantify 6 or fewer item sets (including heterogeneous subsets) by using English labels (I. M. Pepperberg, 1994), was tested on addition of quantities involving 0-6. He was, without explicit training, asked, "How many total X?" for 2 sequentially presented collections (e.g., of variously sized jelly beans or nuts) and required to answer with a vocal English number label. His accuracy suggested (a) that his addition abilities are comparable to those… 

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Ordinality and inferential abilities of a grey parrot (Psittacus erithacus).

  • I. Pepperberg
  • Computer Science
    Journal of comparative psychology
  • 2006
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