Gregory Bateson’s Search for “Patterns Which Connect” Ecology and Mind

@article{Borden2017GregoryBS,
  title={Gregory Bateson’s Search for “Patterns Which Connect” Ecology and Mind},
  author={Richard J. Borden},
  journal={Human Ecology Review},
  year={2017},
  volume={23},
  pages={87-96}
}
  • R. Borden
  • Published 13 December 2017
  • Sociology
  • Human Ecology Review
2 Citations

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References

  • The Psychophysics of Learning
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