Green walls?: integrated laboratory and field testing of the effectiveness of soft wall capping in conserving ruins

@article{Viles2007GreenWI,
  title={Green walls?: integrated laboratory and field testing of the effectiveness of soft wall capping in conserving ruins},
  author={Heather A. Viles and Chris Wood},
  journal={Geological Society, London, Special Publications},
  year={2007},
  volume={271},
  pages={309 - 322}
}
  • H. Viles, C. Wood
  • Published 2007
  • Environmental Science
  • Geological Society, London, Special Publications
Abstract Soft wall capping, which involves placing a cap of soil and turf (or other vegetation) on the top of ruined walls, is a potentially low cost, easy to maintain, ecologically sensitive and effective method of conserving ruined monuments. An integrated programme of laboratory and field testing has been designed to test the performance of soft capping in comparison with hard capping at a range of sites in England. A sample of ruined walls has been soft capped and monitored using repeat… 

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