Green Tea and Black Tea Consumption and Prostate Cancer Risk: An Exploratory Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies

@article{Zheng2011GreenTA,
  title={Green Tea and Black Tea Consumption and Prostate Cancer Risk: An Exploratory Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies},
  author={Ju-Sheng Zheng and Bin Yang and Tao Huang and Yinghua Yu and Jing Yang and Duo Li},
  journal={Nutrition and Cancer},
  year={2011},
  volume={63},
  pages={663 - 672}
}
Observational studies on tea consumption and prostate cancer (PCa) risk are still inconsistent. The authors conducted a meta-analysis to investigate the association between green tea and black tea consumption with PCa risk. Thirteen studies providing data on green tea or black tea consumption were identified by searching PubMed and ISI Web of Science databases and secondary referencing qualified for inclusion. A random-effects model was used to calculate the summary odds ratios (OR) and their… 
The association of tea consumption with bladder cancer risk: a meta-analysis.
TLDR
The data suggest that high overallTea intake in smokers increased the risk of bladder cancer, and high black tea intake in female may reduce the riskof bladder cancer.
The association of tea consumption and the risk and progression of prostate cancer: a meta-analysis.
TLDR
The results show that regardless of tea type, tea consumption might be a potential protective factor for the PCa, especially in China and India, and no significant effect was found in both localized and advanced PCa in stage subgroup analyses.
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It was showed that both green tea and coffee consumption, but not black tea consumption, have protective effects on EC, as well as a borderline significantly inverse association of highest vs. non/lowest coffee consumption.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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Tea consumption and the risk of five major cancers: a dose–response meta-analysis of prospective studies
TLDR
Subgroup analysis showed that increase in consumption of three cups of black tea per day was a significant risk factor for breast cancer, and results did not show a protective role of tea in five major cancers.
Tea consumption and the incidence of cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective observational studies
  • Yu-fei Zhang, Qin Xu, Yu-hao Zhou
  • Medicine
    European journal of cancer prevention : the official journal of the European Cancer Prevention Organisation
  • 2015
TLDR
High tea consumption had no significant effect on the risk of gastric, rectal, colon, lung, pancreatic, liver, breast, prostate, ovarian, bladder cancers or gliomas, and in western countries, an increase in the consumption of tea by one cup per day was associated with a reduced risk of bladder cancer.
Associations of tea and coffee consumption with prostate cancer risk
TLDR
There is further evidence that tea consumption may be a modifiable exposure that reduces PCa risk, and coffee consumption was not associated with risk of overall PCa or PCa in subgroups defined by tumor grade or stage.
Non-herbal tea consumption and ovarian cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational epidemiologic studies with indirect comparison and dose–response analysis
TLDR
The results suggest that non-herbal tea, especially GT, is associated with a reduced risk of OC, and future studies should explore biochemical evidence regarding the variation in chemopreventive effects between different types of non-Herbal tea.
Original Article The association of tea consumption and the risk and progression of prostate cancer: a meta-analysis
TLDR
The results show that regardless of tea type, tea consumption might be a potential protective factor for the PCa, especially in China and India.
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