Greater flamingos Phoenicopterus roseus use uropygial secretions as make-up

@article{Amat2010GreaterFP,
  title={Greater flamingos Phoenicopterus roseus use uropygial secretions as make-up},
  author={Juan A Amat and Miguel A. Rend{\'o}n and Juan Garrido‐Fern{\'a}ndez and Araceli Garrido and Manuel Rend{\'o}n-Martos and Antonio P{\'e}rez-G{\'a}lvez},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2010},
  volume={65},
  pages={665-673}
}
It was long thought that the colour of bird feathers does not change after plumage moult. However, there is increasing evidence that the colour of feathers may change due to abrasion, photochemical change and staining, either accidental or deliberate. The coloration of plumage due to deliberate staining, i.e. with cosmetic purposes, may help individuals to communicate their quality to conspecifics. The presence of carotenoids in preen oils has been previously only suggested, and here we confirm… Expand

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