Great Lakes Rangifer and Paleoindians: Archaeological and Paleontological Caribou Remains from Michigan

@article{Lemke2015GreatLR,
  title={Great Lakes Rangifer and Paleoindians: Archaeological and Paleontological Caribou Remains from Michigan},
  author={Ashley Lemke},
  journal={PaleoAmerica},
  year={2015},
  volume={1},
  pages={276 - 283}
}
  • Ashley Lemke
  • Published 1 July 2015
  • Environmental Science, Geography
  • PaleoAmerica
Abstract It is often argued that Paleoindians in the Great Lakes were targeting caribou as a primary economic resource, but this assertion has been difficult to test since zooarchaeological remains in the region are extremely scarce due to degradation in highly acidic soils. This paper presents new faunal evidence from Michigan including archaeological and paleontological Rangifer specimens (n = 27), and one cervid tooth fragment recovered from a submerged caribou hunting site in Lake Huron… 

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