Grazing as an Optimization Process: Grass-Ungulate Relationships in the Serengeti

@article{McNaughton1979GrazingAA,
  title={Grazing as an Optimization Process: Grass-Ungulate Relationships in the Serengeti},
  author={Samuel J. McNaughton},
  journal={The American Naturalist},
  year={1979},
  volume={113},
  pages={691 - 703}
}
  • S. McNaughton
  • Published 1 May 1979
  • Environmental Science
  • The American Naturalist
A substantial literature is reviewed which indicates that compensatory growth upon tissue damage by herbivory is a major component of plant adaptation to herbivores. Experiments in Tanzania's Serengeti National Park showed that net above-ground primary productivity of grasslands was strongly regulated by grazing intensity in wet-season concentration areas of the large ungulate fauna. Moderate grazing stimulated productivity up to twice the levels in ungrazed control plots, depending upon soil… 
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