Gray (Literature) Matters: Evidence of Selective Hypothesis Reporting in Social Psychological Research

@article{Cairo2020GrayM,
  title={Gray (Literature) Matters: Evidence of Selective Hypothesis Reporting in Social Psychological Research},
  author={Athena H Cairo and J. Green and D. Forsyth and A. Behler and T. Raldiris},
  journal={Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin},
  year={2020},
  volume={46},
  pages={1344 - 1362}
}
Selective reporting practices (SRPs)—adding, dropping, or altering study elements when preparing reports for publication—are thought to increase false positives in scientific research. Yet analyses of SRPs have been limited to self-reports or analyses of pre-registered and published studies. To assess SRPs in social psychological research more broadly, we compared doctoral dissertations defended between 1999 and 2017 with the publications based on those dissertations. Selective reporting… Expand

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