Gravitational waves from kinks on infinite cosmic strings

@article{Kawasaki2010GravitationalWF,
  title={Gravitational waves from kinks on infinite cosmic strings},
  author={Masahiro Kawasaki and Koichi Miyamoto and Kazunori Nakayama},
  journal={Physical Review D},
  year={2010},
  volume={81},
  pages={103523}
}
Gravitational waves emitted by kinks on infinite strings are investigated using detailed estimations of the kink distribution on infinite strings. We find that gravitational waves from kinks can be detected by future pulsar timing experiments such as SKA for an appropriate value of the string tension, if the typical size of string loops is much smaller than the horizon at their formation. Moreover, the gravitational wave spectrum depends on the thermal history of the Universe and hence it can… Expand

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