Grass’s Die Blechtrommel and Rabelais’ Gargantua and Pantagruel: Translating the Picaresque into a German Context after 1945

@article{Arnds2019GrasssDB,
  title={Grass’s Die Blechtrommel and Rabelais’ Gargantua and Pantagruel: Translating the Picaresque into a German Context after 1945},
  author={Peter Arnds},
  journal={Oxford German Studies},
  year={2019},
  volume={48},
  pages={311 - 327}
}
When Grass was working on Die Blechtrommel in Paris, Paul Celan recommended he read Gottlob Regis’ translation of Rabelais’ Gargantua and Pantagruel. By drawing on Mikhail Bakhtin’s theory of the carnival this article analyses Grass’s indebtedness to the French author for the purpose of attacking the political climate of his time. The focus is on body images, Grass’s criticism of the state and the church, instances of misogyny, the human/animal divide, questions of genre and parody, as well as… Expand

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Abstract Renaissance satire has long been a neglected field of study, which is most likely due to the difficulty decoding its targets, to its nonliterary utilitarian purpose, and to the menace ofExpand