Grandmothers and the evolution of human longevity: A review of findings and future directions

@article{Hawkes2013GrandmothersAT,
  title={Grandmothers and the evolution of human longevity: A review of findings and future directions},
  author={Kristen Hawkes and James E. Coxworth},
  journal={Evolutionary Anthropology: Issues},
  year={2013},
  volume={22}
}
Women and female great apes both continue giving birth into their forties, but not beyond. However humans live much longer than other apes do. Even in hunting and gathering societies, where the mortality rate is high, adult life spans average twice those of chimpanzees, which become decrepit during their fertile years and rarely survive them. Since women usually remain healthy through and beyond childbearing age, human communities include substantial proportions of economically productive… 

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Male mating choices: The drive behind menopause?

...

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