Grandmothering and the evolution of homo erectus.

@article{Oconnell1999GrandmotheringAT,
  title={Grandmothering and the evolution of homo erectus.},
  author={James F. O'connell and Kristen Hawkes and Nicholas G. Blurton Jones},
  journal={Journal of human evolution},
  year={1999},
  volume={36 5},
  pages={
          461-85
        }
}
Despite recent, compelling challenge, the evolution of Homo erectus is still commonly attributed to big game hunting and/or scavenging and family provisioning by men. Here we use a version of the "grandmother" hypothesis to develop an alternative scenario, that climate-driven adjustments in female foraging and food sharing practices, possibly involving tubers, favored significant changes in ancestral life history, morphology, and ecology leading to the appearance, spread and persistence of H… 
Natural history of Homo erectus.
  • S. Antón
  • Biology, Medicine
    American journal of physical anthropology
  • 2003
TLDR
It is argued that H. erectus is a hominin, notable for its increased body size, that originates in the latest Pliocene/earliest Pleistocene of Africa and quickly disperses into Western and Eastern Asia and is also an increasingly derived homin in with several regional morphs sustained by intermittent isolation, particularly in Southeast Asia.
Grandmothers and the evolution of human longevity
  • K. Hawkes
  • Biology, Medicine
    American journal of human biology : the official journal of the Human Biology Council
  • 2003
TLDR
Using modern humans and chimpanzees to represent, respectively, genus Homo and australopithecines, two corollaries of the grandmother hypothesis are focused on: that ancestral age‐specific fertility declines persisted in the authors' genus, while 2) senescence in other aspects of physiological performance slowed down.
The Centrality of Ancestral Grandmothering in Human Evolution
When RA Fisher, GC Williams, and WD Hamilton laid the foundations of evolutionary life history theory, they recognized elements of what became a grandmother hypothesis to explain the evolution of
ENERGETICS AND THE EVOLUTION OF THE GENUS HOMO
TLDR
This paper considers the energetic correlates of the emergence of the genus Homo and suggests that there were three major changes in maintenance energy requirements, including an absolute increase in energy requirements due to greater body size, and a shift in the relative requirements of the different organs.
Diet in early Homo : A review of the evidence and a new model of adaptive versatility
TLDR
Early Homo species more likely had adaptations for flexible, versatile subsistence strategies that would have served them well in the variable paleoenvironments of the African Plio-Pleistocene.
Male strategies and Plio-Pleistocene archaeology.
TLDR
Collectively, Plio-Pleistocene site location and assemblage composition are consistent with the hypothesis that large carcasses were taken not for purposes of provisioning, but in the context of competitive male displays, suggesting that meat was consumed at or near the point of acquisition, not at home bases as the hunting hypothesis requires.
Grandmothers, hunters and human life history
This paper critiques the competing “Grandmother Hypothesis” and “Embodied Capital Theory” as evolutionary explanations of the peculiarities of human life history traits. Instead, I argue that the
Die Ernährung des Menschen im evolutionsmedizinischen Kontext
TLDR
The food selection during hominid evolution is characterized based on current paleontologic research to show that there was neither specialization in certain foods, nor a typical plant-animal ratio nor a defined macronutrient distribution.
Grandmother hypothesis and primate life histories.
  • H. Alvarez
  • Biology, Medicine
    American journal of physical anthropology
  • 2000
TLDR
The shape of the argument herein demonstrates the utility of life history theory for solving problems of adaptive evolution in female life history traits, with consequences for broader arguments regarding human evolution.
Diet and the evolution of the earliest human ancestors.
  • M. Teaford, P. Ungar
  • Biology, Medicine
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • 2000
TLDR
The cranial and dental traits of the early australopithecines through time are traced to show that between 4.4 million and 2.3 million years ago, the dietary capabilities of the earliest hominids changed dramatically, leaving them well suited for life in a variety of habitats and able to cope with significant changes in resource availability associated with long-term and short-term climatic fluctuations.
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