Grammatical issues in graphic symbol communication

@article{Sutton2002GrammaticalII,
  title={Grammatical issues in graphic symbol communication},
  author={Ann Sutton and Gloria Soto and Susan Blockberger},
  journal={Augmentative and Alternative Communication},
  year={2002},
  volume={18},
  pages={192 - 204}
}
In this article, issues and concepts related to the study of production, comprehension, and acquisition of syntax and morphology by children who need augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems are reviewed. The use of graphic symbols when vocal speech is severely limited presents significant challenges to the typical process of language acquisition. A conceptual and theoretical context is presented, and concerns that seem unique to AAC are explored. Productive lines of research… Expand
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