Grading quality of evidence and strength of recommendations

@article{Atkins2004GradingQO,
  title={Grading quality of evidence and strength of recommendations},
  author={David Atkins and Dana Best and Peter A. Briss and M. Eccles and Yngve T. Falck‐Ytter and Signe Flottorp and Gordon H. Guyatt and Robin T Harbour and Margaret C. Haugh and David Henry and Suzanne Rose Hill and Roman Jaeschke and Gillian Leng and Alessandro Liberati and Nicola Magrini and James Mason and Philippa F Middleton and Jacek Z. Mrukowicz and Dianne O'Connell and Andrew David Oxman and Bob Phillips and Holger J. Schünemann and Tessa Tan-Torres Edejer and Helena Varonen and Gunn Elisabeth Vist and John W. Williams and Stephanie Zaza},
  journal={BMJ : British Medical Journal},
  year={2004},
  volume={328},
  pages={1490}
}
Abstract Users of clinical practice guidelines and other recommendations need to know how much confidence they can place in the recommendations. Systematic and explicit methods of making judgments can reduce errors and improve communication. We have developed a system for grading the quality of evidence and the strength of recommendations that can be applied across a wide range of interventions and contexts. In this article we present a summary of our approach from the perspective of a… Expand
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