Gossips and telephones

@article{Baker1972GossipsAT,
  title={Gossips and telephones},
  author={Brenda S. Baker and Robert E. Shostak},
  journal={Discrete Mathematics},
  year={1972},
  volume={2},
  pages={191-193}
}
Answer. Let f(n) be the minimum number of calls needed for n people. It is easily shown that f(1) = 0, f(2) = 1, f(3) = 3 and f(4) = 4. For n > 4, 2n− 4 calls are sufficient according to the following procedure: one of four “chief” gossips first calls each of the remaining n− 4 gossips, then the four learn each other’s (and hence everyone’s) information in 4 calls (as f(4) = 4), and finally one of the four chiefs calls each of the other n− 4 gossips. Theorem. f(n) = 2n− 4 for n > 4. Proof… CONTINUE READING

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The gossip problem

  • Discrete Mathematics
  • 1973
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HIGHLY INFLUENTIAL

Gossips and telephones

Brenda Baker, Robert Shostak
  • Discrete Mathematics
  • 1972
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Szemerédi; A cure for the telephone disease

A. Hajnal, E.E.C. Milner
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