Gossip and Ostracism Promote Cooperation in Groups

@article{Feinberg2014GossipAO,
  title={Gossip and Ostracism Promote Cooperation in Groups},
  author={Matthew Feinberg and Robb Willer and Michael Schultz},
  journal={Psychological Science},
  year={2014},
  volume={25},
  pages={656 - 664}
}
The widespread existence of cooperation is difficult to explain because individuals face strong incentives to exploit the cooperative tendencies of others. In the research reported here, we examined how the spread of reputational information through gossip promotes cooperation in mixed-motive settings. Results showed that individuals readily communicated reputational information about others, and recipients used this information to selectively interact with cooperative individuals and ostracize… 

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