Good things come to those who wait: Delaying gratification likely does matter for later achievement

@inproceedings{Doebel2019GoodTC,
  title={Good things come to those who wait: Delaying gratification likely does matter for later achievement},
  author={Sabine Doebel},
  year={2019}
}
A seminal finding in psychology is that children who delay gratification by waiting for two marshmallows instead of eating one right away fare better later in life (Shoda, Mischel, & Peake, 1990). However, a recent conceptual replication suggests that this original finding is not robust to the inclusion of covariates (Watts, Duncan, and Quan, 2018). Drawing on theory and evidence, we argue that Watts et al.’s analyses may have removed the very relationship of interest by controlling for… 
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