Goblins, Morlocks, and weasels: classic fantasy and the Industrial Revolution

@article{Zanger1977GoblinsMA,
  title={Goblins, Morlocks, and weasels: classic fantasy and the Industrial Revolution},
  author={Jules Zanger},
  journal={Children's Literature in Education},
  year={1977},
  volume={8},
  pages={154-162}
}
  • J. Zanger
  • Published 1 December 1977
  • Economics
  • Children's Literature in Education
8 Citations
Goblinisation : a Reading of the Colonial Subject , Degeneration and Marginalisation in The Princess and the Goblin ( 1872 ) and The Princess and Curdie ( 1883 ) by George MacDonald ( 1824-1905 )
George MacDonald‟s two longer fairy tales, Princess and the Goblin (1872) and The Princess and Curdie (1883) reflect key preoccupations of nineteenth century English society such as the Darwinian
A Complete Identity: the Image of the Hero in the Work of G. A. Henty (1832–1902) and George MacDonald (1824–1905)
This study is an examination of the hero image in the work of G.A. Henty (1832-1902) and George MacDonald (1824-1905) and a reassessment of the hitherto oppositional critiques of their writing. The
Goblinization: a Reading of the Colonial Subject and Degeneration in The Princess and the Goblin (1872) and The Princess and Curdie (1883) by George MacDonald (1824-1905)
George MacDonald‟s two longer fairy tales, Princess and the Goblin (1872) and The Princess and Curdie (1883) reflect key preoccupations of nineteenth century English society such as the Darwinian
INKLINGS FOREVER, Volume IV
G. K. Chesterton‟s last line of The Babe Unborn presents the key to his profound spiritual theology—a way of seeing the world which conveys gratitude for sheer existence and a fairyland attitude of

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