Gobang ist PSPACE-vollständig

@article{Reisch2004GobangIP,
  title={Gobang ist PSPACE-vollst{\"a}ndig},
  author={Stefan Reisch},
  journal={Acta Informatica},
  year={2004},
  volume={13},
  pages={59-66}
}
  • Stefan Reisch
  • Published 2004
  • Mathematics, Computer Science
  • Acta Informatica
  • SummaryFor many games, the decision problem of whether a player in a given situation has a winning strategy has been shown to be PSPACE-complete. Following the PSPACE-completeness results of Even and Tarjan [1] for generalized Hex on graphs and of Schaefer [6] for a variety of combinatorial games, the decision problems were shown to be PSPACE-hard for generalizations of Go and Checkers. In this paper a corresponding theorem is proved for the board-game Gobang, a variant of Go. Since the… CONTINUE READING
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