Glycosylated human oxyhaemoglobin activates nuclear factor-kappaB and activator protein-1 in cultured human aortic smooth muscle.

@article{Peir2003GlycosylatedHO,
  title={Glycosylated human oxyhaemoglobin activates nuclear factor-kappaB and activator protein-1 in cultured human aortic smooth muscle.},
  author={Concepci{\'o}n Peir{\'o} and Nuria Matesanz and Juli{\'a}n Nevado and Nuria Lafuente and E. B. Cercas and Ver{\'o}nica Azcutia and S J Hern{\'a}ndez Vallejo and Leocadio Rodr{\'i}guez-Ma{\~n}as and Carlos F{\'e}lix S{\'a}nchez-Ferrer},
  journal={British journal of pharmacology},
  year={2003},
  volume={140 4},
  pages={681-90}
}
Diabetic vessels undergo structural changes that are linked to a high incidence of cardiovascular diseases. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediate cell signalling in the vasculature, where they can promote cell growth and activate redox-regulated transcription factors, like activator protein-1 (AP-1) or nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB), which are involved in remodelling and inflammation processes. Amadori adducts, formed through nonenzymatic glycosylation, can contribute to ROS formation in… CONTINUE READING