Glutathione deficiency in alcoholics: risk factor for paracetamol hepatotoxicity.

@article{Lauterburg1988GlutathioneDI,
  title={Glutathione deficiency in alcoholics: risk factor for paracetamol hepatotoxicity.},
  author={Bernhard H. Lauterburg and Mar{\'i}a Eugenia Gonz{\'a}lez V{\'e}lez},
  journal={Gut},
  year={1988},
  volume={29},
  pages={1153 - 1157}
}
Patients chronically abusing ethanol are more susceptible to the hepatotoxic effects of paracetamol. This could be due to an increased activation of the drug to a toxic metabolite or to a decreased capacity to detoxify the toxic metabolite by conjugation with glutathione (GSH). To test these hypotheses paracetamol 2 g was administered to five chronic alcoholics without clinical evidence of alcoholic liver disease and five control subjects. The urinary excretion of cysteine- plus N-acetyl… Expand
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