Glucoraphanin, the bioprecursor of the widely extolled chemopreventive agent sulforaphane found in broccoli, induces phase-I xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and increases free radical generation in rat liver.

@article{Perocco2006GlucoraphaninTB,
  title={Glucoraphanin, the bioprecursor of the widely extolled chemopreventive agent sulforaphane found in broccoli, induces phase-I xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and increases free radical generation in rat liver.},
  author={Paolo Perocco and Giorgio Bronzetti and Donatella Canistro and Luca Valgimigli and Andrea Sapone and Alessandra Affatato and Gian Franco Pedulli and Laura Pozzetti and Massimiliano Broccoli and Renato Iori and Jessica Barillari and Valeriana Sblendorio and Marvin S. Legator and M. Paolini and S. Z. Abdel-Rahman},
  journal={Mutation research},
  year={2006},
  volume={595 1-2},
  pages={125-36}
}
Epidemiological and animal studies linking high fruit and vegetable consumption to lower cancer risk have strengthened the belief that long-term administration of isolated naturally occurring dietary constituents could reduce the risk of cancer. In recent years, metabolites derived from phytoalexins, such as glucoraphanin found in broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables (Brassicaceae), have gained much attention as potential cancer chemopreventive agents. The protective effect of these… CONTINUE READING