Glomerular filtration rate estimates decrease during high altitude expedition but increase with Lake Louise acute mountain sickness scores.

@article{Pichler2008GlomerularFR,
  title={Glomerular filtration rate estimates decrease during high altitude expedition but increase with Lake Louise acute mountain sickness scores.},
  author={Judith Pichler and Lorenz Risch and U. Hefti and Tobias Michael Merz and A. J. Turk and Konrad E Bloch and Marco Maggiorini and T. Hess and Daniel Barthelmes and Otto D. Schoch and Gert Risch and Andreas R. Huber},
  journal={Acta physiologica},
  year={2008},
  volume={192 3},
  pages={
          443-50
        }
}
  • Judith Pichler, Lorenz Risch, +9 authors Andreas R. Huber
  • Published in Acta physiologica 2008
  • Biology, Medicine
  • AIM Acute mountain sickness (AMS) can result in pulmonary and cerebral oedema with overperfusion of microvascular beds, elevated hydrostatic capillary pressure, capillary leakage and consequent oedema as pathogenetic mechanisms. Data on changes in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) at altitudes above 5000 m are very limited. METHODS Thirty-four healthy mountaineers, who were randomized to two acclimatization protocols, undertook an expedition on Muztagh Ata Mountain (7549 m) in China. Tests… CONTINUE READING

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