Globalization and social determinants of health: The role of the global marketplace (part 2 of 3)

@article{Labont2007GlobalizationAS,
  title={Globalization and social determinants of health: The role of the global marketplace (part 2 of 3)},
  author={Ronald Labont{\'e} and Ted Schrecker},
  journal={Globalization and Health},
  year={2007},
  volume={3},
  pages={6 - 6}
}
Globalization is a key context for the study of social determinants of health (SDH): broadly stated, SDH are the conditions in which people live and work, and that affect their opportunities to lead healthy lives.In the first article in this three part series, we described the origins of the series in work conducted for the Globalization Knowledge Network of the World Health Organization's Commission on Social Determinants of Health and in the Commission's specific concern with health equity… Expand
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