Global warming and recurrent mass bleaching of corals

@article{Hughes2017GlobalWA,
  title={Global warming and recurrent mass bleaching of corals},
  author={Terry P. Hughes and James T. Kerry and Mariana {\'A}lvarez-Noriega and Jorge G {\'A}lvarez-Romero and Kristen D Anderson and Andrew H. Baird and Russell C. Babcock and Maria Beger and David R. Bellwood and R. A. Berkelmans and Tom C. L. Bridge and Ian R. Butler and Maria Byrne and Neal Cantin and Steeve Comeau and Sean R. Connolly and Graeme S. Cumming and Steven J. Dalton and Guillermo Diaz-Pulido and C. Mark Eakin and Will F. Figueira and James P. Gilmour and Hugo B. Harrison and Scott F. Heron and Andrew S. Hoey and Jean-Paul A. Hobbs and Mia O. Hoogenboom and Emma V. Kennedy and Chao-Yang Kuo and Janice M. Lough and Ryan J. Lowe and Gang Liu and Malcolm T McCulloch and Hamish A. Malcolm and Michael J. McWilliam and John M. Pandolfi and R. J. Pears and Morgan S. Pratchett and Verena Schoepf and Tristan Simpson and William J. Skirving and Brigitte Sommer and Gergely Torda and David R. Wachenfeld and Bette L Willis and Shaun K. Wilson},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2017},
  volume={543},
  pages={373-377}
}
During 2015–2016, record temperatures triggered a pan-tropical episode of coral bleaching, the third global-scale event since mass bleaching was first documented in the 1980s. Here we examine how and why the severity of recurrent major bleaching events has varied at multiple scales, using aerial and underwater surveys of Australian reefs combined with satellite-derived sea surface temperatures. The distinctive geographic footprints of recurrent bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef in 1998, 2002… Expand
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