Global warming and amphibian losses; The proximate cause of frog declines? (Reply)

@article{Pounds2007GlobalWA,
  title={Global warming and amphibian losses; The proximate cause of frog declines? (Reply)},
  author={J. Alan Pounds and Mart{\'i}n R. Bustamante and Luis A. Coloma and Jamie A. Consuegra and Michael P. L. Fogden and Prudence N. Foster and Enrique la Marca and Karen L. Masters and Andr{\'e}s Merino‐Viteri and Robert Puschendorf and Santiago R. Ron and G. Arturo S{\'a}nchez‐Azofeifa and Christopher J. Still and Bruce E. Young},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2007},
  volume={447},
  pages={E5-E6}
}
Alford et al. question the working model underlying our test for a link between global warming and amphibian disappearances, and Di Rosa et al. criticize our emphasis on a single proximate agent, the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis. Both teams report key pieces of the amphibian-decline puzzle and new evidence from different parts of the world that climate change is a factor in these losses. Here we show why our working model was appropriate and highlight the complexity of the… 

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