Global hotspots of species richness are not congruent with endemism or threat

@article{Orme2005GlobalHO,
  title={Global hotspots of species richness are not congruent with endemism or threat},
  author={Christopher David L. Orme and Richard G. Davies and Malcolm D. Burgess and Felix Eigenbrod and Nicola J Pickup and Val{\'e}rie A. Olson and Andrea J. Webster and Tzung-Su Ding and Pamela C. Rasmussen and Robert S. Ridgely and Alison J. Stattersfield and Peter M. Bennett and Tim M. Blackburn and Kevin J. Gaston and Ian P. F. Owens},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2005},
  volume={436},
  pages={1016-1019}
}
Biodiversity hotspots have a prominent role in conservation biology, but it remains controversial to what extent different types of hotspot are congruent. Previous studies were unable to provide a general answer because they used a single biodiversity index, were geographically restricted, compared areas of unequal size or did not quantitatively compare hotspot types. Here we use a new global database on the breeding distribution of all known extant bird species to test for congruence across… Expand

Figures, Tables, and Topics from this paper

Global mammal distributions, biodiversity hotspots, and conservation
TLDR
A global examination of distributions of all nonmarine mammals to determine patterns of species richness, endemism, and endangerment, and to evaluate the degree of congruence among hotspots of these three measures of diversity in mammals found it necessary to assign global conservation priorities based on hotspots. Expand
Towards biodiversity hotspots effective for conserving mammals with small geographic ranges
TLDR
It is demonstrated that index hotspot types are highly efficient because they conserve 79% of mammal species (21% more species than richness hotspots types), and selection of different diversity measures to define hotspots may strongly affect the achievement of conservation goals. Expand
Global distribution and conservation of rare and threatened vertebrates
TLDR
The results indicate that ‘silver-bullet’ conservation strategies alone will not deliver efficient conservation solutions, and priority areas for biodiversity conservation must be based on high-resolution data from multiple taxa. Expand
Multiple forms of hotspots of tetrapod biodiversity and the challenges of open-access data scarcity
TLDR
This study uses the most comprehensive database for tetrapod vertebrates in Uruguay (spanning 664 species) assembled to date, to identify hotspots of species-richness, endemism and threatened species for the first time, revealing negligible spatial congruence among biodiversity hotspots. Expand
Spatial incongruence among hotspots and complementary areas of tree diversity in southern Africa
Aim Biodiversity hotspots have important roles in conservation prioritisation, but efficient methods for selecting among them remain debated. Location Southern Africa. Methods In this study, we usedExpand
Distribution, congruence, and hotspots of higher plants in China
TLDR
It is found that over 90% of threatened species in China are concentrated and biodiversity information should be considered when identifying biological hotspots, and other factors should be included as well to develop biodiversity conservation plans in accordance with the region’s specific conditions. Expand
Accumulation over evolutionary time as a major cause of biodiversity hotspots in conifers
TLDR
It is suggested that conifer hotspots have primarily formed as a result of lineages accumulating over evolutionary time scales in stable mountainous areas rather than through high origination, preferential retention of relictual lineages or radiation of species with unique traits, although such processes may contribute to nuanced differences among hotspots. Expand
Spatially congruent sites of importance for global shark and ray biodiversity
TLDR
Low congruency is found among all three measures of species richness, with the threatened species comprising a smaller subset of the overall species patterns irrespective of hotspot definition, and evolutionarily distinct species richness had the highest overlap with total species richness regardless of resolution or definition of hotspots. Expand
Hotspots of species richness, threat and endemism for terrestrial vertebrates in SW Europe
The Mediterranean basin, and the Iberian Peninsula in particular, represent an outstanding “hotspot” of biological diversity with a long history of integration between natural ecosystems and humanExpand
Hotspots within a global biodiversity hotspot - areas of endemism are associated with high mountain ranges
TLDR
These areas of endemism in Iran, a major component of the Irano-Anatolian biodiversity hotspot, are identified and can form the basis for defining areas with conservation priority in this global biodiversity hotspots. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 38 REFERENCES
Complementarity and the use of indicator groups for reserve selection in Uganda
A major obstacle to conserving tropical biodiversity is the lack of information as to where efforts should be concentrated. One potential solution is to focus on readily assessed indicator groups,Expand
A Comparison of Richness Hotspots, Rarity Hotspots, and Complementary Areas for Conserving Diversity of British Birds
Biodiversity conservation requires efficient methods for choosing priority areas for in situ conservation management. We compared three quantitative methods for choosing 5% (an arbitrary figure) ofExpand
Rare species, the coincidence of diversity hotspots and conservation strategies
SPECIES conservation in situ requires networks of protected areas selected for high conservation interest1–3. Throughout most of the world, however, there are neither the resources nor the time toExpand
Contribution of rarity and commonness to patterns of species richness
TLDR
It is shown here that commoner species are most responsible for richness patterns, suggesting that a broad understanding of what determines the majority of spatial variation in biodiversity may be had by considering only a minority of species. Expand
The spatial distribution of threatened species: macro-scales and New World birds
  • K. Gaston, T. Blackburn
  • Geography
  • Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences
  • 1996
Despite the urgent need to understand how threatened species are distributed across the globe, empirical analyses of geographical patterns of threat at large scales across physically, rather thanExpand
Threatened and endemic species: are they good indicators of patterns of biodiversity on a national scale?
TLDR
Although nationally threatened and endemic species are important conservation targets, the results indicate that reserve networks focusing solely on these species may not be sufficient to preserve overall species diversity in a country. Expand
Multiscale assessment of patterns of avian species richness
  • C. Rahbek, G. Graves
  • Geography, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • 2001
TLDR
The data reinforce the hypothesis that terrestrial species richness from the equator to the poles is ultimately governed by a synergism between climate and coarse-scale topographic heterogeneity. Expand
Threatened biotas: "Hot spots" in tropical forests
  • N. Myers
  • Biology, Medicine
  • The Environmentalist
  • 1988
TLDR
10 areas that, a) are characterised by exceptional concentrations of species with high levels of endemism and b) are experiencing unusually rapid rates of depletion are identified, so conservationists can engage in a more systematised response to the challenge of largescale extinctions impending in tropical forests. Expand
Endemic Bird Areas of the World: Priorities for Biodiversity Conservation
TLDR
The authors discuss the wider conservation relevance of EBAs, including why birds are good indicators of biodiversity, and how EBAs can be used effectively to influence policy-makers. Expand
Mapping biodiversity using surrogates for species richness: macro-scales and New World birds
  • K. Gaston, T. Blackburn
  • Biology
  • Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences
  • 1995
TLDR
Numbers of genera and families are found to have the strongest correlations with species richness, and to provide the best predictions of the numbers of species in areas of Central and South America on the basis of data for North America. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
...