Global emergence of infectious diseases: links with wild meat consumption, ecosystem disruption, habitat degradation and biodiversity loss

@inproceedings{2020GlobalEO,
  title={Global emergence of infectious diseases: links with wild meat consumption, ecosystem disruption, habitat degradation and biodiversity loss},
  author={},
  year={2020}
}
  • Published 2020
  • Environmental Science
 The frequency and economic impact of emerging infectious diseases is on the rise.  Nearly three-fourths of emerging infectious diseases – and almost all recent pandemics – are zoonotic, that is they originate in animals, mostly wildlife.  As with many other types of human-wildlife conflict, their emergence often involves dynamic interactions among populations of wildlife, livestock and people within environments that rapidly change due to human activities, especially: 
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