Global emergence of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis and amphibian chytridiomycosis in space, time, and host.

@article{Fisher2009GlobalEO,
  title={Global emergence of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis and amphibian chytridiomycosis in space, time, and host.},
  author={Matthew C. Fisher and Trenton W. J. Garner and Susan F. Walker},
  journal={Annual review of microbiology},
  year={2009},
  volume={63},
  pages={
          291-310
        }
}
Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) is a chytrid fungus that causes chytridiomycosis in amphibians. Only named in 1999, Bd is a proximate driver of declines in global amphibian biodiversity. The pathogen infects over 350 species of amphibians and is found on all continents except Antarctica. However, the processes that have led to the global distribution of Bd and the occurrence of chytridiomycosis remain unclear. This review explores the molecular, epidemiological, and ecological evidence that… 

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    PloS one
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TLDR
This is the first time Bd has been confirmed in amphibians from Madagascar and presents an urgent call to action to catalyze a swift, targeted response to isolate and eradicate Bd from Madagascar.
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