Global effects of smoking, of quitting, and of taxing tobacco.

@article{Jha2014GlobalEO,
  title={Global effects of smoking, of quitting, and of taxing tobacco.},
  author={Prabhat Jha and Richard Peto},
  journal={The New England journal of medicine},
  year={2014},
  volume={370 1},
  pages={
          60-8
        }
}
  • P. Jha, R. Peto
  • Published 2014
  • Medicine
  • The New England journal of medicine
Cigarette smoking is a major cause of illness and death. This article reviews both the magnitude of the disease burden from cigarette smoking worldwide and strategies to limit smoking. 

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