Global distribution of Y-chromosome haplogroup C reveals the prehistoric migration routes of African exodus and early settlement in East Asia

@article{Zhong2010GlobalDO,
  title={Global distribution of Y-chromosome haplogroup C reveals the prehistoric migration routes of African exodus and early settlement in East Asia},
  author={Hua Zhong and Hong Shi and Xuebin Qi and Chun-jie Xiao and Li Jin and Runlin Zhang Ma and Bing Su},
  journal={Journal of Human Genetics},
  year={2010},
  volume={55},
  pages={428-435}
}
The regional distribution of an ancient Y-chromosome haplogroup C-M130 (Hg C) in Asia provides an ideal tool of dissecting prehistoric migration events. We identified 465 Hg C individuals out of 4284 males from 140 East and Southeast Asian populations. We genotyped these Hg C individuals using 12 Y-chromosome biallelic markers and 8 commonly used Y-short tandem repeats (Y-STRs), and performed phylogeographic analysis in combination with the published data. The results show that most of the Hg C… Expand
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