Global climate change and soil carbon stocks; predictions from two contrasting models for the turnover of organic carbon in soil

@article{Jones2005GlobalCC,
  title={Global climate change and soil carbon stocks; predictions from two contrasting models for the turnover of organic carbon in soil},
  author={Chris D. Jones and Claire McConnell and Kevin Coleman and Peter M. Cox and Pete Falloon and DAVID S. Jenkinson and David S. Powlson},
  journal={Global Change Biology},
  year={2005},
  volume={11}
}
Enhanced release of CO2 to the atmosphere from soil organic carbon as a result of increased temperatures may lead to a positive feedback between climate change and the carbon cycle, resulting in much higher CO2 levels and accelerated global warming. However, the magnitude of this effect is uncertain and critically dependent on how the decomposition of soil organic C (heterotrophic respiration) responds to changes in climate. Previous studies with the Hadley Centre's coupled climate–carbon cycle… 

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