Global chlorine emissions from biomass burning: Reactive Chlorine Emissions Inventory

@article{Lobert1999GlobalCE,
  title={Global chlorine emissions from biomass burning: Reactive Chlorine Emissions Inventory},
  author={J{\"u}rgen M. Lobert and William C. Keene and Jennifer A. Logan and Rosemarie Yevich},
  journal={Journal of Geophysical Research},
  year={1999},
  volume={104},
  pages={8373-8389}
}
Emissions of reactive chlorine-containing compounds from nine discrete classes of biomass burning were estimated on a 1° latitude by 1° longitude grid based on a biomass burning inventory for carbon emissions. Variations on approaches incorporating both emission ratios relative to CO and CO2 and the chlorine content of biomass burning fuels were used to estimate fluxes and associated uncertainties. Estimated, global emissions are 640 Gg Cl yr -1 for CH3Cl; 49 Gg Cl yr -1 for CH2Cl2; 1.8 Gg Cl… 

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