Global aphasia without hemiparesis

@article{Legatt1987GlobalAW,
  title={Global aphasia without hemiparesis},
  author={Alan D. Legatt and Mitchell J. Rubin and L R Kaplan and Edward B. Healton and John C. M. Brust},
  journal={Neurology},
  year={1987},
  volume={37},
  pages={201 - 201}
}
Acute global aphasia without hemiparesis has been considered pathognomonic of embolic stroke. During 1 year, we encountered six patients with this syndrome. Two had multiple strokes, probably embolic. One had atrial fibrillation; at autopsy, there were metastases as well as multiple infarcts in the left hemisphere. One had a single large infarct in the territory of an anterior branch of the middle cerebral artery (MCA), one had subarachnoid hemorrhage of unknown origin, and one had a sylvian… 

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