Global Warming and Tropical Land-Use Change: Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Biomass Burning, Decomposition and Soils in Forest Conversion, Shifting Cultivation and Secondary Vegetation

@article{Fearnside2000GlobalWA,
  title={Global Warming and Tropical Land-Use Change: Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Biomass Burning, Decomposition and Soils in Forest Conversion, Shifting Cultivation and Secondary Vegetation},
  author={Philip Martin Fearnside},
  journal={Climatic Change},
  year={2000},
  volume={46},
  pages={115-158}
}
  • P. Fearnside
  • Published 1 July 2000
  • Environmental Science
  • Climatic Change
Tropical forest conversion, shiftingcultivation and clearing of secondary vegetation makesignificant contributions to global emissions ofgreenhouse gases today, and have the potential forlarge additional emissions in future decades. Globally, an estimated 3.1×109 t of biomasscarbon of these types is exposed to burning annually,of which 1.1×109 t is emitted to the atmospherethrough combustion and 49×106 t is converted tocharcoal (including 26–31×106 t C of blackcarbon). The amount of biomass… 
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