Global Trajectories of the Long-Term Decline of Coral Reef Ecosystems

@article{Pandolfi2003GlobalTO,
  title={Global Trajectories of the Long-Term Decline of Coral Reef Ecosystems},
  author={John M. Pandolfi and Roger Bradbury and Enric Sala and Terry P. Hughes and Karen A Bjorndal and Richard G Cooke and Deborah Ann McArdle and Loren McClenachan and Marah J. H. Newman and Gustavo Paredes and Robert R. Warner and Jeremy B C Jackson},
  journal={Science},
  year={2003},
  volume={301},
  pages={955 - 958}
}
Degradation of coral reef ecosystems began centuries ago, but there is no global summary of the magnitude of change. We compiled records, extending back thousands of years, of the status and trends of seven major guilds of carnivores, herbivores, and architectural species from 14 regions. Large animals declined before small animals and architectural species, and Atlantic reefs declined before reefs in the Red Sea and Australia, but the trajectories of decline were markedly similar worldwide… Expand
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