Global Human Footprint on the Linkage between Biodiversity and Ecosystem Functioning in Reef Fishes

@article{Mora2011GlobalHF,
  title={Global Human Footprint on the Linkage between Biodiversity and Ecosystem Functioning in Reef Fishes},
  author={Camilo Mora and Octavio Aburto‐Oropeza and Arturo Ayala Bocos and Paula Ayotte and Stuart Banks and Andrew G. Bauman and Maria Beger and Sandra Bessudo and David J. Booth and Eran Brokovich and Andrew J. Brooks and Pascale Chabanet and Joshua E. Cinner and Jorge Cort{\'e}s and Juan J. Cruz‐Motta and Amilcar Cupul Maga{\~n}a and Edward E. DeMartini and Graham J. Edgar and David A. Feary and Sebastian C. A. Ferse and Alan M. Friedlander and Kevin J. Gaston and Charlotte Gough and Nicholas A. J. Graham and Alison L. Green and H{\'e}ctor Mendoza Guzm{\'a}n and Marah J. Hardt and Michel Kulbicki and Yves Letourneur and Andr{\'e}s M L{\'o}pez P{\'e}rez and Michel Loreau and Yossi Loya and Camilo Martinez and Ismael Mascare{\~n}as-Osorio and Tau Morove and Marc O. Nadon and Yohei Nakamura and Gustavo Paredes and Nicholas V C Polunin and Morgan S. Pratchett and H{\'e}ctor Reyes Bonilla and Fernando Rivera and Enric Sala and Stuart A. Sandin and German A. Soler and Rick D. Stuart-Smith and Emmanuel Tessier and Derek P. Tittensor and Mark Tupper and Paolo Usseglio and Laurent Vigliola and Laurent Wantiez and Ivor D. Williams and Shaun K. Wilson and Fernando A Zapata},
  journal={PLoS Biology},
  year={2011},
  volume={9}
}
A global survey of reef fishes shows that the consequences of biodiversity loss are greater than previously anticipated as ecosystem functioning remained unsaturated with the addition of new species. Additionally, reefs worldwide, particularly those most diverse, are highly vulnerable to human impacts that are widespread and likely to worsen due to ongoing coastal overpopulation. 
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