Global Environmental Change: Past, Present, and Future

@inproceedings{Turekian1996GlobalEC,
  title={Global Environmental Change: Past, Present, and Future},
  author={Karl K. Turekian},
  year={1996}
}
  • K. Turekian
  • Published 11 January 1996
  • Environmental Science
1. The Changing Planet. 2. Chronology. 3. The Evolution of the Atmosphere. 4. Temperature Variation Over Time. 5. The Circulation of the Atmosphere and Oceans. 6. Sea Level. 7. Carbon Dioxide, Methane, and Global Warming. 8. Chlorinated Fluorocarbons (CFCs) and Stratospheric Ozone. 9. Acid Rain and Tropospheric Ozone. 10. Human Migration and Population Growth, and Environmental Change. 11. Natural Catastrophes and the History of Life. Epilog. Index. 

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