Global Completeness of the Bat Fossil Record

@article{Eiting2009GlobalCO,
  title={Global Completeness of the Bat Fossil Record},
  author={Thomas P. Eiting and Gregg F. Gunnell},
  journal={Journal of Mammalian Evolution},
  year={2009},
  volume={16},
  pages={151-173}
}
Bats are unique among mammals in their use of powered flight and their widespread capacity for laryngeal echolocation. Understanding how and when these and other abilities evolved could be improved by examining the bat fossil record. However, the fossil record of bats is commonly believed to be very poor. Quantitative analyses of this record have rarely been attempted, so it has been difficult to gauge just how depauperate the bat fossil record really is. A crucial step in analyzing the quality… 
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