Global Co‐Distribution of Light at Night (LAN) and Cancers of Prostate, Colon, and Lung in Men

@article{Kloog2009GlobalCO,
  title={Global Co‐Distribution of Light at Night (LAN) and Cancers of Prostate, Colon, and Lung in Men},
  author={Itai Kloog and Abraham Haim and Richard G. Stevens and Boris A. Portnov},
  journal={Chronobiology International},
  year={2009},
  volume={26},
  pages={108 - 125}
}
The incidence rates of cancers in men differ by countries of the world. We compared the incidence rates of three of the most common cancers (prostate, lung, and colon) in men residing in 164 different countries with the population‐weighted light at night (LAN) exposure and with several developmental and environmental indicators, including per capita income, percent urban population, and electricity consumption. The estimate of per capita LAN exposure was a novel aspect of this study. Both… 
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