Global Catastrophic Risks

@inproceedings{Bostrom2008GlobalCR,
  title={Global Catastrophic Risks},
  author={Nick Bostrom and Milan M. {\'C}irkovi{\'c}},
  year={2008}
}
Acknowledgements Foreword Introduction I BACKGROUND Long-term astrophysical processes Evolution theory and the future of humanity Millenial tendencies in responses to apocalyptic threats Cognitive biases potentially affecting judgement of global risks Observation selection effects and global catastrophic risks Systems-based risk analysis Catastrophes and insurance Public policy towards catastrophe II RISKS FROM NATURE Super-volcanism and other geophysical processes of catastrophic import… 

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