Global Carbon Budget 2018

@article{LeQur2014GlobalCB,
  title={Global Carbon Budget 2018},
  author={Corinne Le Qu{\'e}r{\'e} and Robbie M. Andrew and Pierre Friedlingstein and Stephen A. Sitch and Julia Pongratz and Andrew C. Manning and Jan Ivar Korsbakken and Glen P. Peters and Josep G. Canadell and Robert B. Jackson and Thomas A. Boden and Pieter P. Tans and Oliver Andrews and Vivek K. Arora and Dorothee C. E. Bakker and Leticia Barbero and Leticia Barbero and Meike Becker and Meike Becker and Richard A. Betts and Richard A. Betts and Laurent Bopp and Fr{\'e}d{\'e}ric Chevallier and Louise P. Chini and Philippe Ciais and Catherine E. Cosca and J. N. Cross and Kim I. Currie and Thomas Gasser and I. C. Harris and Judith Hauck and Vanessa Haverd and Richard A. Houghton and Christopher W. Hunt and George C. Hurtt and Tatiana Ilyina and Atul K. Jain and Etsushi Kato and Markus Kautz and Ralph F. Keeling and Kees Klein Goldewijk and Arne K{\"o}rtzinger and Peter Landsch{\"u}tzer and Nathalie Lef{\`e}vre and Andrew Lenton and Andrew Lenton and Sebastian Lienert and Sebastian Lienert and Ivan D. Lima and Danica L. Lombardozzi and Nicolas Metzl and F. J. Millero and P. M. S. Monteiro and David R. Munro and Julia Nabel and Shin‐ichiro Nakaoka and Yukihiro Nojiri and Xos{\'e} A. Padin and Anna M. Peregon and Benjamin Pfeil and Benjamin Pfeil and Denis Pierrot and Denis Pierrot and Benjamin I Poulter and Benjamin I Poulter and Gregor Rehder and Janet Reimer and Christian R{\"o}denbeck and J{\"o}rg Schwinger and Roland S{\'e}f{\'e}rian and Ingunn Skjelvan and Benjamin D. Stocker and Hanqin Tian and Bronte Tilbrook and Bronte Tilbrook and Francesco Nicola Tubiello and Ingrid van der Laan-Luijkx and Guido van der Werf and Steven van Heuven and Nicolas Viovy and Nicolas Vuichard and Anthony P. Walker and Andrew J. Watson and Andy Wiltshire and Sönke Zaehle and Dan Zhu},
  journal={Earth System Science Data},
  year={2014}
}
Abstract. Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere – the “global carbon budget” – is important to better understand the global carbon cycle, support the development of climate policies, and project future climate change. Here we describe data sets and methodology to quantify the five major components of the global carbon budget and their uncertainties. Fossil CO2 emissions (EFF) are based… 

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Abstract. The global carbon budget of terrestrial ecosystems is chiefly determined by major flows of carbon dioxide (CO2) such as photosynthesis and respiration, but various minor flows exert

A review of the major drivers of the terrestrial carbon uptake: model-based assessments, consensus, and uncertainties

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Accurate assessment of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial biosphere is important to better understand the global carbon

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Abstract. Terrestrial and oceanic carbon cycle processes remove ~55 % of global carbon emissions, with the remaining 45 %, known as the "airborne fraction", accumulating in the atmosphere. The
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