Glittering prizes for research support

@article{Horrobin1986GlitteringPF,
  title={Glittering prizes for research support},
  author={David Frederick Horrobin},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1986},
  volume={324},
  pages={221-221}
}
  • D. Horrobin
  • Published 1 November 1986
  • Political Science
  • Nature
Could public support for research be cheapened, and made more productive, by following the eighteenth-century precedent of the British government's prize for a means of measuring longitude? 
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