Glia and their cytokines in progression of neurodegeneration

@article{Mrak2005GliaAT,
  title={Glia and their cytokines in progression of neurodegeneration},
  author={Robert E. Mrak and W. Sue T. Griffin},
  journal={Neurobiology of Aging},
  year={2005},
  volume={26},
  pages={349-354}
}
A glia-mediated, inflammatory immune response is an important component of the neuropathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease, of the midlife neurodegeneration of Down's syndrome, and of other age-related neurodegenerative conditions. All of these conditions are associated with early and often dramatic activation of, and cytokine overexpression in, microglia and astrocytes, sometimes decades before pathological changes consistent with a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease are apparent, as in patients… Expand

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