Glass-transition temperature of water: a simulation study.

@article{Giovambattista2004GlasstransitionTO,
  title={Glass-transition temperature of water: a simulation study.},
  author={Nicolas Giovambattista and C. Austen Angell and Francesco Sciortino and Harry Eugene Stanley},
  journal={Physical review letters},
  year={2004},
  volume={93 4},
  pages={
          047801
        }
}
We report a computer simulation study of the glass transition for water using the extended simple point charge potential. To mimic the difference between standard and hyperquenched glass, we generate glassy configurations with different cooling rates, and we calculate the temperature dependence of the specific heat on heating. The absence of crystallization phenomena allows us, for properly annealed samples, to detect in the specific heat the simultaneous presence of a weak prepeak ("shadow… 

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