Glass-Box: Explaining AI Decisions With Counterfactual Statements Through Conversation With a Voice-enabled Virtual Assistant

@inproceedings{Sokol2018GlassBoxEA,
  title={Glass-Box: Explaining AI Decisions With Counterfactual Statements Through Conversation With a Voice-enabled Virtual Assistant},
  author={Kacper Sokol and Peter A. Flach},
  booktitle={International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence},
  year={2018}
}
The prevalence of automated decision making, influencing important aspects of our lives -- e.g., school admission, job market, insurance and banking -- has resulted in increasing pressure from society and regulators to make this process more transparent and ensure its explainability, accountability and fairness. We demonstrate a prototype voice-enabled device, called Glass-Box, which users can question to understand automated decisions and identify the underlying model's biases and errors. Our… 

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