Glaciation as a destructive and constructive control on mountain building

@article{Thomson2010GlaciationAA,
  title={Glaciation as a destructive and constructive control on mountain building},
  author={Sir Thomson and Mark T. Brandon and Jonathan H. Tomkin and Peter W. Reiners and Cristi{\'a}n V{\'a}squez and Nathaniel J. Wilson},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2010},
  volume={467},
  pages={313-317}
}
Theoretical analysis predicts that enhanced erosion related to late Cenozoic global cooling can act as a first-order influence on the internal dynamics of mountain building, leading to a reduction in orogen width and height. The strongest response is predicted in orogens dominated by highly efficient alpine glacial erosion, producing a characteristic pattern of enhanced erosion on the windward flank of the orogen and maximum elevation controlled by glacier equilibrium line altitude, where long… 
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Here, we review an ensemble of observations that point towards a global increase of erosion rates in regions of elevated mountain belts, or otherwise high relief, since the onset of Northern
Worldwide acceleration of mountain erosion under a cooling climate
TLDR
It is found that mountain erosion rates have increased since about six million years ago and most rapidly since two million years old, implying an increase in sediment flux at a global scale that coincides closely with enhanced cooling during the Pliocene and Pleistocene epochs.
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