Glacial refugia and recolonization pathways in the brown seaweed Fucus serratus

@article{Hoarau2007GlacialRA,
  title={Glacial refugia and recolonization pathways in the brown seaweed Fucus serratus},
  author={G Hoarau and James A. Coyer and Jan Veldsink and Wytze T. Stam and Jeanine L. Olsen},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={2007},
  volume={16}
}
The last glacial maximum (20 000–18 000 years ago) dramatically affected extant distributions of virtually all northern European biota. Locations of refugia and postglacial recolonization pathways were examined in Fucus serratus (Heterokontophyta; Fucaceae) using a highly variable intergenic spacer developed from the complete mitochondrial genome of Fucus vesiculosus. Over 1500 samples from the entire range of F. serratus were analysed using fluorescent single strand conformation polymorphism… 
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